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20110701
20110731
Search Results 0 to 25 of about 26 (some duplicates have been removed)
>> welcome to our program. we begin with the prime minister of great britain, david cameron, answering questions in the house of commons. we have an assessment from lionel barber, the editor of the "financial times," and london bureau chief, catherine mayer. >> it came up in yesterday's hearing, and it's willful blindness. that is to say those people who should have known but didn't ask the right questions, for whatever motive. that is the question that mrs. brooks has to answer. >> we continue this evening with the incredible story of one of the richest women in china, zhang xin. >> from the outside, i hear friends talk about the rise of china, the politicians knowing what they do. in fact, someone mo who ves, works in china, a different picture. chinese are complaining about the government. the government seems to be rolling out of the policies, and managing the everyday problems. and in terms of theconfence ofecoming a superpower, i see -- i just don't see that. >> we conclude this evening with investigative reporter and author ahony somers. he's written a book called "th
business in britain would be... would have been utterly beleaguered. it was he back in '86 that allowed newspaper innovation to come in. he took the "times" tabloid, everybody said he was crazy. this is a guy, for better or worse, who loves newspapers. and the "times" of london has been building up its foreign bureaus at a time. i mean, the "washington post" here is down to a handful. "chicago tribune" has known. he's been building up the foreign bureaus. he's had the courage to put up a pay wall and say "you've got to pay for what journalists do online." i wanted to point out that... ande's had tremendous courage in the very bold investments he's made. i spent along time with h 20 years ago when he was just embarking on sky b and fox here in the u.s. i don't like fox,ut to break theriopoly of the networks was an exaordinarily business achievement. now, fox's contribution to the situatioin the u.s. today is very damaging, i thin but as a bhed media executive, he has been the visionary, along with turner, i would say, of the last 20 to 30 years. >> rose: certainly in a global way. >> yea
to be rdered mile dowler. in is exploded in the public mind in britain and has spread around the world affecting even u.s. investors perceptions of the wider pire which goes so much widethan these british newspapers. through that period, rupert murdoch and his son james seemed absolutely determined to stand by rebecca brooks, there are very few people in this company who are cler to rupert and the whole family to his children as well than rebecca brooks, she was a very integral memberf this sort of london court that had formed around james and his sister elizabeth and which had included david cameron and other members of the british political media establishment. only a week or so ago rupert murdoch said he had total confidence in rebecca brooks. the first thing he did when he flew into london to try and sort this crisis out was stage a photo opportunity with his arm around rebecca, asked what his first priority was on landing in london. he pointed to her and said this one. >> rose: so why did she resign? >> i think because the attempts to take the pressure off so far had failed. the c
on britain to make. >> yes. >> to live with. >> yes. >> is full fuing science. >> yeah,. >> what is it about david cameron that made him a believer. okay, so he had a science minister david willits who was very pro this. but also a number of us including myself, actually, had a lot of discussion at different levels of government including with david cameron and persuaded him that science and knowledge is the basisof innovation and innovation is the basis of economic growth. >> and that, if you switch off the knowledge machine you ll swih of ultimate growth. and they bought into that as they should have done. >> that's part of what the president emphasized in his state of the union speech. >> he did. i think -- >> what's the difrence in cameron and obama? >> wel, i think i think we-- i think the problem here is you have toave a long-term view. so the oma smulation money though very welcome was for a two year period. and it's not like building roads and keeping people in the employment. science is actually best seens a long-term invement. and rlly. >> but the key is investment rather than expe
Search Results 0 to 25 of about 26 (some duplicates have been removed)